September 23, 2019

Health Care Is Inexorably Changing, Despite Legal Uncertainty

For the nation’s health care system, there may be no going back.

No matter what the Supreme Court decides about the constitutionality of the federal law adopted last year, health care in America has changed in ways that will not be easily undone. Provisions already put in place, like tougher oversight of health insurers, the expansion of coverage to one million young adults and more protections for workers with pre-existing conditions are already well cemented and popular.

And a combination of the law and economic pressures has forced major institutions to wrestle with the relentless rise in health care costs.

From Colorado to Maryland, hospitals are scrambling to buy hospitals. Doctors are leaving small private practices. Large insurance companies are becoming more dominant as smaller ones disappear because they cannot stay competitive. States are simplifying decades of Medicaid rules and planning new ways for poor and rich alike to buy policies more easily.

But how to pay for these changes, and what will happen to the 30 million uninsured Americans the law intends to cover, will be up in the air if the mandate at the heart of the law — the requirement that individuals buy health insurance or face a penalty — is struck down.

The election results of 2010 and stiff state opposition to the mandate also complicate the picture. Hospital administrators, insurers and doctors are counting on federal subsidies and coverage expansion that would result in a surge of patients with insurance to offset cuts in government programs that many fear could soon become draconian. Large health systems could then use their newfound clout to demand higher prices from private insurers even as federal and state governments pay less.

Other changes influenced by the legislation may leave some patients and doctors lost in the new land of giants. As medicine moves from a cottage industry to one dominated by large organizations, some patients with insurance will probably find their choices more limited. But their care may be better coordinated, as hospitals, doctors and even insurers join to streamline services.

“The system is transforming itself,” said Charles N. Kahn III, president of the Federation of American Hospitals. “But the success of these changes depends a lot on whether there is sufficient funding.”

Hospital systems are anticipating a major influx of federal funds and patients as a result of the law. In Maryland, for instance, the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System recently bought two suburban hospitals and is spending several hundred million dollars on computer systems to link its clinics and hospitals across the state. It has hired hundreds of primary care doctors and nurses, forged partnerships with urgent care clinics and expanded home health service to serve an expected flood of new patients.

“If the law is struck down, health care reform will have to continue one way or another,” said Patricia Brown, president of Johns Hopkins HealthCare.

Across town, Baltimore Medical System, a community health center, expects to expand its medical staff by 50 percent over the next three years to accommodate an anticipated increase in patients to 70,000 from 47,000.

“We are looking for new clinicians on a constant basis,” said Jay Wolvovsky, the system’s chief executive, who said that hiring would stop if the law were overturned and federal funding were in doubt. “We wouldn’t be able to expand and we’d be stuck where we are.”

In states like Texas, the law is deeply unpopular, and the medical association has a “Calendar of Doom” listing the timeline for important provisions of the law and other government rules. Still, changes in delivering medical care are taking hold, including a move away from small doctor practices that were predominant for more than a century.

Texas medicine will never be the same no matter what happens with the law, said Louis J. Goodman, the association’s chief executive, and older doctors blame a cascade of new rules and changes well beyond the new health law. “There’s a feeling among doctors here that government is crushing them,” Mr. Goodman said.

And even though critics say the law does little to reduce the costs of care, its passage touched off myriad efforts to pare widespread waste.

“The interest from the doctor and hospital community has accelerated,” Tom Richards, a senior executive at Cigna, said of efforts to exact savings and improve care.

Article source: http://feeds.nytimes.com/click.phdo?i=40a8075a5adfa1bc2dc61dd259c0f9ba

Speak Your Mind